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Article I Project

The President is not a lawmaker and the leaders appointed to run large bureaucratic government departments no longer fear or respect the congressional authority elected to hold them accountable. Once these leaders have been confirmed, those that even require confirmation, the department leads scoff at congressional inquiry, operate outside of budgetary constraints, and report only to the executive branch who nominated them. This is bad for Democrats and Republicans alike. Many of these agencies self-fund and self-regulate. This was not the vision of our founders who understood that an unconstrained executive branch could too easily become corrupt and fail to represent the interests of the people. This was the intent behind the separation of powers. Congress was given the majority of authority because they are the "people's house" who's two year election cycle and small local districts would serve to keep them the closest to the people and therefor the most accountable. However, over time Congress has abdicated that authority allowing for an unfettered growth of government, executive over reach through misuse of executive order (instructions to departments), and the rapid growth of non-accountable regulatory agencies.

This coalition of members of the House and Senate, known as the Article I Project, are reclaiming the Article I powers of the Constitution. Through a series of legislative initiatives, the goal is to restore Constitutional government, reclaim the power of the purse, reduce the impact regulatory agencies and bureaucrats have on the American people, and restore a nation "of the people, by the people and for the people."

I pledge that I will be a champion of this cause and will tirelessly work to restore the power of our Nation to the people whom we serve. Congress is not a place to build influence and power, but an opportunity to serve those who we are fortunate enough to represent.

Article I Project


Paid for By Philip Singleton For Congress
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